In 1947, the Uncle Bobs Club (UBC) raised £10,700 to build a 26 bedroom Nurses’ Home extension at The Children’s Orthopaedic Hospital in Mt Eliza. The official opening on November 20, 1948, was honoured by the presence of Lady Dugan, alongside hospital committee president Lady Latham and president of the Uncle Bobs Club, Mr J. Kirkwood.

The UBC have a long association with The Royal Children’s Hospital. In December of 1941, a raffle book was passed around the Riversdale Hotel in Hawthorn. The money raised would be donated to the children’s hospital to benefit their orthopaedic section. Four men at the bar that night were so moved, they decided to form a group to raise money for the Children’s Hospital, year-round. The membership fee would be a shilling (a “bob”) a week – and in January of 1942, the club began. The UBC continues to this day.

Frank Hargreaves, the UBC Historian, kindly shared with us mementos from this time including a photocopy of the original cheque.

We have also included a candid and intimate film highlighting the pride and excitement felt by staff, guests and patients attending the opening of such a modern purpose-built facility. Prior to this, nurses were accommodated in Beachleigh House, which was built in 1878, and originally designed as a family holiday home. We also catch glimpses of the incredible grounds and unique location of the orthopaedic hospital with its spectacular sea views.

Related films:

Christmas Festivities, A Healing Tide, Uncle Bobs Club, Final Days at the Mt Eliza Orthopaedic Hospital.

Film Title: Opening of the Uncle Bobs Club Nurses’ Home
Production Date: 1948
Location: The Children’s Orthopaedic Section; Mt Eliza, Victoria
Media: 16mm colour film, silent
Measurement: 2.54 minutes
Maker: The Royal Children’s Hospital; Parkville, Victoria
Rights: Film courtesy of The Royal Children’s Hospital
Accession Number: 2018.2491



This film may have been edited to comply with privacy laws and ethics guidelines.
Any opinions, social attitudes and medical advice contained in this film reflect the society and medical practice accepted at the time the film was made. Attitudes, community standards, and medical opinions change over time with societal and medical advances. Please view this film with a historical perspective in mind, and be aware that any opinions, attitudes, and advice depicted are no longer representative of The Royal Children’s Hospital.